The enterprising young man whose name is at the head of this article, is one of the stable and successful business men of Southwick, engaged in the mercantile business and also postmaster, in which capacities he displays ability and faithfulness.

Walter E. Daggett was born in Shabonier, Fayette County, Illinois, on May 23, 1866, being the son of Louis N. and Charlotte (Wilkins) Daggett. The father is now living with the son but the mother died when Walter was four months old. After this sad event he went to live with distant relatives, Reuben E. Wetmore, at Nokomis, Illinois.

When fifteen he went with the family to South Dakota, and two years later Mrs. Wetmore died. Walter remained with them until twenty-two and then married Miss Louisa A., daughter of Simon and Maria (Thode) Sievers, of German extraction. The wedding occurred in Huron, and a few months later we find the young couple in Sioux City, whence they went to St. Louis, where he remained seven years in the employ of the Edison General Electric Company of St. Louis. Three children were born to them there: Dora G., Adaline M., and Walter N. In May, 1897, Mr. Daggett came to Idaho to join his father who was postmaster at Southwick. In 1889 the office was transferred to our subject and with that and the duties of his commercial business he has been occupied since.

In political matters he is a Republican and is now justice of the peace. He has been delegate to the County conventions and is now a delegate to the state convention. Fraternally he is affiliated with the A. F. & A. M., Kendrick Lodge, No. 26; with the W. W., at Leland and the M. W. A., LeBaron Camp, No. 9383, at Cavendish, Idaho. Mrs. Daggett has three brothers and four sisters: G. W., at home with the old people, who are prosperous and prominent farmers; Henry, in Westbend, Washington County, Wisconsin, is justice of the peace and a prominent man and promoter of factory interests; William, a capitalist in Huron, South Dakota; Dora, wife of Fred Schoenleber, in South Dakota; Amelia, wife of Gustave Thode, a farmer in Bazile Mills, Nebraska; Mary, wife of Isaac Van Winkle, in Huron, in the real estate business; Helen, wife of Edward Van Dyke, at Southwick, Idaho. In addition to other business transacted, Mr. Daggett learned to set type and is skilled in that line. As a man he is of good standing and an attractive personality, while he numbers his friends by scores.

Back to: Nez Perce Biographies

Source: An Illustrated History of Northern Idaho, Embracing Nez Perce, Idaho, Latah, Kootenai and Shoshone Counties, Western Historical Publishing Company, 1903