Near the town of Forest lives the stockman and agriculturist mentioned at the head of this article and he has achieved success in the business world and is considered one of the substantial men of the section.

Amos K. Richardson was born in Franklin County, Missouri, on March 24, 1839, being the son of Aaron and Nancy (Brown) Richardson, natives of Kentucky. The father was born in 1797 and died in 1884. He was a pioneer in Missouri, volunteered to go in the Mexican war but did not get to the front.

He came to Oregon in 1846 and participated in the Rogue River war. The mother of our subject was born in 1799 and died in 1863. Our subject came to Oregon overland in an ox train with his parents and they experienced considerable trouble with the Indians enroute. After six months of hard traveling they landed in Yamhill County and later the father took land in Benton County, which is still in the family.

Amos K. grew to manhood there and improved the scanty opportunity to gain an education. When twenty-two he began to work for himself and in 1879 he settled in the vicinity of Colfax and there farmed for fourteen years. In 1893 he came to Nez Perces County and took up land on Mission creek near the Catholic mission. In 1901 he came to his present place on the Salmon. He pays attention to raising stock and is skillful in this occupation.

In 1862 Mr. Richardson married Miss Julathia Cox, who died in 1876, leaving four children, George B., Robert B., Benjamin and Anna. In 1879 Mr. Richardson married a second time and the lady of his choice was Judith Vallandingham and the wedding occurred in Prineville, Oregon. Three children have been born to this union: Ollie, Clarence and Chauncey. Mr. Richardson has four brothers. Hiram, John C, Richard, Aaron. Politically Mr. Richardson is a Democrat and takes an interest in the questions of the day.

Back to: Nez Perce Biographies

Source: An Illustrated History of Northern Idaho, Embracing Nez Perce, Idaho, Latah, Kootenai and Shoshone Counties, Western Historical Publishing Company, 1903